New Study – Australian Naturalistic Driving Study

Mar 17, 2016 | Research Articles | 0 comments

Australian Naturalistic Driving Study

The trainers and staff at Corporate Driver Training Australia are extremely excited about this new innovative study to study behaviour and habits of drivers in different conditions.

This study is being undertaken by the University of New South Sales (UNSW), in conjunction with Monash University in Victoria which will be known as the Australian Naturalistic Driving Study (ANDS).

The study’s prime objective is to recognise how drivers behave when driving their vehicles in everyday driving conditions and also in safety critical situations.

360 participants from both New South Wales and Victoria will have data collection equipment installed in their cars, equipped with multiple sensors such as video and still camera, GPS, accelerometers, radars to analyse their behaviour.

This data will look upon the habits of the driver, taking note of the speed and lane position of the vehicle driven and also the behaviour and interaction of the car with other road users – cars and trucks, motorcyclists and pedestrians.

Results from ANDS will be used to help develop new road safety programs and policies that will aim to save lives and lessen the chance of injuries on Australian roads.

The study is still seeking participants to help future road users. If you are interested in participating, you can follow the JOIN THE STUDY links at their website at www.ands.unsw.edu.au

Trainers and staff at Corporate Driver Training Australia are extremely excited about this new innovative study. We devote the majority of our training sessions to analysing driver behaviour and the results of the study are certain to throw up new discussion points in our training sessions. – Understanding Driver Behaviour is at the core of motivating people to take driving seriously.

 

For more information about our driving courses at Corporate Driver Training Australia, please contact us on 1800 757 615 or use our Contact Form.