Driving With Hands at 10 And 2

Driving With Hands at 10 And 2

Were you taught that driving with hands at 10 and 2 was the correct hand position on the steering wheel? If so, then you’re not alone!
Driving with hands at 10 and 2 on the steering wheel has been taught to young drivers for years, the theory being that a higher grip allowed for more control. It has long been considered the safest and most reliable way to drive. However, with the passing of time and the invention of new technologies, some experts are now arguing that 9 and 3 is safer, or even as low as 7 and 4.
Driving with hands at 10 and 2 has been the favourite of safety experts and police for years. But with the invention of airbags, if a driver has their hands at 10 and 2 on the steering wheel and an accident occurs, the airbags can cause injury. Drivers can find their hands twist awkwardly, breaking faces, thumbs, bones or otherwise causing injury.
This is why some experts now suggest that having hands at 9 and 3 is safer, as it keeps hands out of harm’s way in the event of an accident, and still allows for complete control of the vehicle.
The idea of driving with hands at 10 and 2 was also before power steering; originally steering wheels needed more force to turn, and pulling down was the best and most efficient way to achieve this. A lower grip helps to keep balance, and makes it easier to stay in control during unexpected and hasty maneuverers, while also providing a better turning radius.
It is also more natural to hold the wheel at 9 and 3; allowing drivers to keep their hands the wheel longer without fatiguing.
Correct positioning of the hands is key to optimum driving performance and safety. Positioning can give a driver an edge in an emergency situation, and can be the difference between a horrible crash and a minor accident.
Drivers should be aware though; there isn’t a law that states explicitly where drivers have to keep their hands while operating their vehicle. There is a Law that dictates drivers must be in control of their cars at all times, so if someone is driving erratically or recklessly, police can and will intervene. Regardless of positioning, drivers should keep both hands on the wheel at all times and avoid unnecessary distractions.
While experts may differ in opinion on the correct position to hold the steering wheel, what they do all agree on is that drivers should stay in control of their vehicle at all times.
Regardless of the legality, we encourage all drivers to engage in low-risk driver behaviours and drive in a way that will ensure the safety of themselves and everyone else on the road.
It makes good sense for company drivers to undertake low-risk driver training regularly to refresh skills.
Corporate Driver Training Australia is one of the leading institutions for driver training in Australia, providing a number of high quality courses.
Contact us to find out more about our range of courses, and how they can help keep your drivers safe on the road.